the simple rhythms of fullness of life

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the simple rhythms of fullness of life – martin stewart

the bird song at dawn
the warm woman in the bed
the first noticed breath after waking
the eyes opening
the shift of the body
the feet on the floor
the bathroom
and the water

echo of the first day
reminder of the womb

the wonder of lungs
the blood
the bones
the skin
the light

the earth
where I get to operate

the cleansing

whatever comes next I know
where I am,
what I am,
who I am,
that I am

the gift has already been given
what foolishness that I seek to find
what has already found me

it spoke to me

hawea-ranges
it spoke to me
– Martin Stewart

just a moment ago
I caught a wisp of cloud
moving over the peak
in the Himalayas

if I hadn’t been looking
I would have missed it

I didn’t really catch it – you know,
as if I could ‘handle’ it
I caught it in the sense of a mind-snap
it popped by
there to be noticed if I cared

I did notice
I was a long way away
across the planet in a building
not even trying to picture
that place I have never been

that wisp of cloud,
for a moment
I felt the chill of it

it spoke to me

I am just over here, it said,
quite close
tied to you really
my breath is so tender
you can blow it away if you want to

if you want to you can diminish me

don’t try to catch me,
care for me,
if I am well
you will be well

for this place is rather small
and you and I are not far from each other.

City in Ruins

Six years on from the devastating earthquake in my home city of Christchurch it was so very special to spend the evening prior to the anniversary in the care of Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band who performed in Christchurch.
I enjoyed the whole three hour experience – the energy, the big-heartedness, the brokenness and the joyfulness of all that was offered.

20170221_205907But in particular I (along with the other 30,000 people it seemed) was moved to the core by his rendition of My City In Ruins.  The opportunity for collective lament in a sensitive ten-minute long rendition of the song was hugely helpful.  To be carefully lifted from lament to hope with the words ‘Come on, rise up, rise up’ was healing in the sense of being able to recognise from this distance that a rising had indeed taken place.  Slowly but surely a foothold in the future has emerged, for the city, for the majority of its people, and for me in my work and my other modes of life.  We have been held.

It was great to be invited into the kind of space where I could traverse the journey.  I hadn’t expected to be moved so deeply.  Thanks Bruce!  Thanks for the genuineness of your empathy and care.